Posted tagged ‘pinecastle records’

KIM ROBINS, “Raining in Baltimore,” Pinecastle. 12 tracks

July 10, 2017

If you haven’t discovered Kim Robins yet, this is your chance.

“Raining in Baltimore” is the follow-up to her recent “40 Years Late” album

That title refers to the musical career she put on hold when she became a mother at 19.

Before that, the Bloomington, Indiana, native was an opening act for Loretta Lynn, Conway Twitty, Barbara Mandrell and The Oak Ridge Boys as a teenager.

But that was then and this is now.

And Robins, now a grandmother of two, is back with an all-star studio band — Ron Stewart, Rickey Wasson, Adam Steffey and Harold Nixon.

“Raining in Baltimore” is her first major label release.

And, boy, does she sound good.

“Eye For An Eye,” the opening track, is an uptempo tale of vengeance with a man out to kill the man who killed his son.

Robins wrote three tracks — the title cut about a country girl in a big city hoping to get a call from the one she loves; “She’s Just Like You,” which warns her ex that his new love is just like him and she’ll be as unfaithful as he was; and “Bitter Game,” about a woman who keeps lying to herself when she says she’s over him.

There’s a good bluegrass cover of “My Baby Thinks He’s A Train,” the 1981 Rosanne Cash country hit.

And Robins shines on Dolly Parton‘s “Sacred Memories.”

There’s not a bad track on the album.

Can’t find it in stores?

Try KimRobins.com, starting July 21.

 

FLASHBACK, “Foxhounds and Fiddles,” Pinecastle. 12 tracks.

March 20, 2017

In 1995, J.D. Crowe & the New South was nominated for a Grammy for their album, “Flashback.”

Twenty years later, the four members of the New South — Richard Bennett, Curt Chapman, Don Rigsby and Phil Leadbetter — got back together for a reunion show.

And now, taking the name of that album as the name for the band, the four — along with Stuart Wyrick taking Crowe’s banjo post — have released their first album.

This is actually the second band made up of Crowe alumni.

Wildfire was the first in 2002.

Flashback has a traditional sound, as you would expect.

Bennett and Rigsby wrote the title track, an uptempo song about a man returning to the mountains after his wife dies.

And Bennett co-wrote four other tracks — “Two Rivers,” “Camp Forest,” “Georgia Backroads” and “The Hag Song.”

The latter — a tribute to the late Merle Haggard — is one that Haggard fans will want to hear.

In a nod to the roots of bluegrass, the album includes Carter Stanley‘s “You’re Still To Blame” and Charlie and Ira Louvin‘s “Let Us Travel, Travel On.”

Great album by a band that sounds as good as or maybe better than it did 20 years ago.

Can’t find it in stores?

Try https://www.fbband.com/store.

 

THE GARRETT NEWTON BAND, “Young Heart, Old Soul,” Pinecastle. 12 tracks.

March 13, 2017

 

Garrett Newton is one of those child prodigies — like Marty Stuart and Alison Krauss — who pop up in bluegrass from time to time.

He started playing banjo at 6 and was winning contests within two years.

Now, at 17, he has his own band and a new CD on the market.

The title track was written by Mark “Brink”Brinkman and Terry Foust especially for the band.

It’s an uptempo song about a boy who prefers his grandfather’s old truck to a new car and loves to listen to old bluegrass and country songs.

He was born 40 years too late, the song says.

That’s Newton’s story as well.

He’s not a singer, though.

The vocals are handled by Allen Dyer, the rhythm guitar player.

But Newton’s banjo is clearly the lead instrument on the album.

The album kicks off with a rousing version of “Ain’t Nobody Gonna Miss Me (When I’m Gone),” the old George Jones song that’s been covered by many bluegrass artists.

Then, it moves into “Country Poor and Proud,” a ballad about hard times.

There are three instrumentals — “Farewell Blues,” “Bells of St. Mary” and “Remington Ride.”

There’s four-part harmony on the gospel song, “Old Camp Meeting Time.”

And “The Last Hanging  of Wise County” tells the story of a man hanged for a crime he didn’t commit.

Good album by a newcomer who sounds like he’ll be around awhile.

Can’t find it in stores?

Try http://pinecastlemusic.com/product/young-heart-old-soul/

 

WILDFIRE, “Rented Room on Broadway,” Pinecastle. 12 tracks.

November 28, 2016

Wildfire was formed in 2000, when four former members of J.D. Crowe’s New South began working as the house bluegrass band at Dollywood — Dolly Parton‘s east Tennessee theme park.

After two years there, they hit the bluegrass circuit, playing festivals and concert halls across the country.

Today, band members include Robert Hale, Curt Chapman, Greg Luck, Chris Davis and John Lewis.

All but Chapman are vocalists as well as instrumentalists.

Hale wrote the first track, “Home Again,” about a man who’s been gone too long and finds he doen’t fit in in the city, and “Three,” about a man who finds that there’s about to be an addition to his family.

Most of the songs are bluegrass versions of country and pop hits from years ago.

From the pop charts, there’s The Boxtops‘ 1967 hit, “The Letter”

Country hits include Loretta Lynn‘s “They Don’t Make ‘Em Like My Daddy Anymore” from 1974, Cal Smith‘s “The Ghost of Jim Bob Wilson” from 1976, Mel Street‘s “Small Enough To Crawl” from the 1970s, Keith Whitley‘s “I Get The Picture” from 1985 and “A Bible and A Bus Ticket Home” from Collin Raye in 1994 and Confederate Railroad in 1998.

There’s the gospel of “Driving Nails” and the bluegrass of Carter Stanley‘s “Nobody’s Love Is Like Mine” and Elmer Burchett Jr.’s “Dollar.”

Another good album by a good band.

Look for it in stores on Dec. 9.

Or go to http://pinecastlemusic.com/wildfire/

 

EDGAR LOUDERMILK, “Georgia Maple,” Pinecastle. 12 tracks

June 27, 2016

 

Edgar Loudermilk has paid his dues — and then some.

He started playing bass in his family’s bluegrass band when he was 9 years old.

Eleven years later, Loudermilk joined Carolina Crossfire, a band with a large following in Georgia.

In 2001, he was hired by Rhonda Vincent for her band, The Rage.

A year later, Loudermilk joined Marty Raybon’s Full Circle, playing bass and singing tenor.

In 2007, he moved over to IIIrd Tyme Out, where he stayed until 2013, before deciding to work on a solo career.

“Georgia Maple,” Loudermilk’s latest Pinecastle release, finds him growing stronger as a solo artist.

He wrote or co-wrote eight of the 12 tracks, including the title song about a tree that has always been there on the family farm.

There’s a lot of nostalgia and longing on the album.

“My Kentucky Home” finds the singer visiting his childhood home, where only the barn remains.

“Homesick Blues” finds him on the road feeling bad and heading home.

“My Home In Caroline” finds the singer growing tired of rambling and heading back to the woman he loves.

And “This Letter” finds him writing the woman he loves to tell her he knows he treated her badly and wants to apologize.

“Harvest of My Heart” is about a farmer, giving thanks for his life as he plows his fields.

And Loudermilk turns Don Williams’ 1979 No. 1 country hit, “It Must Be Love,” into a bluegrass tune.

Good album.

Can’t find it in stores? Try EdgarLoudermilk.com

Keith Lawrence (270) 691-7301

klawrence@messenger-inquirer.com

SISTER SADIE, “Sister Sadie,” Pinecastle. 12 tracks

June 13, 2016

 

Female supergroups have been rare in bluegrass music.

But Sister  Sadie is definitely a supergroup and it’s definitely female.

Dale Ann Bradley, Tina Adair, Deanie Richardson, Gena Britt and Beth Lawrence are all well known to bluegrass fans.

And Bradley is a five-time International Bluegrass Music Association female vocalist of the year.

Back in 2013, the women got together for a one-time performance at Nashville’s Station Inn.

It was so successful that they were invited to showcase at the IBMA convention in 2014 and they’ve been doing limited touring since then.

The name, by the way, comes from Tony Rice‘s “Little Sadie,” not the jazz song, “Sister Sadie.”

Now, Pinecastle has released Sister Sadie’s debut album.

The first single, “Unholy Water,” co-written by Richardson, is an uptempo song about moonshine, which “quenchs the thirst of the damned.”

There are two country classics — Carl & Pearl Butler‘s “Don’t Let Me Cross Over” from 1962 and Tanya Tucker‘s “Blood Red and Going Down” from 1973 — and a pop tune, The Carpenters “All I Can Do” from 1969.

Richardson wrote “Ava’s Fury,” the album’s only instrumental.

Adair wrote and sings, “Not This Time,” a song that says she won’t take him back again, and “Now Forever’s Gone,” another good-bye song.

Bradley makes the gospel “Look What I’m Trading For A Mansion” her own in a strong performance.

Adair gives another strong performance on Harley Allen‘s “Mama’s Room,” which is a “place of safety for a child.”

A strong album by five very talented women.

Can’t find it in stores?

Try http://www.sistersadieband.com.

 

NU-BLU, “Nights,” Red Squared. 12 tracks.

May 17, 2010

North Carolina-based Nu-Blu has had a roller-coaster year.

Last October, during the International Bluegrass Music Association’s annual convention in Nashville, Pinecastle Records signed the band to a recording contract.

But before the band’s first album could be released, Pinecastle closed its doors.

Fortunately for fans, Nu-Blu has released the album and its first single — “Spin on a Red Brick Floor” — on its own.

The single, written by Nanci Griffith, is about life on the road and wanting to be with the one you love.

Nu-Blu is centered around Daniel and Carolyn Routh, a couple whose musical background ranges from Broadway-style musicals to gospel, country, blues and classic rock.

When the bluegrass bug bit, they formed Nu-Blu in 2003. That fall, Carolyn suffered two strokes that slowed the band’s development and nearly ended her career before it moved to the national stage.

Kendall Gales and Levi Austin round out the band, which describes itself as giving “the listener a diverse experience, while remaining within the realms of bluegrass.”

Greg Luck, who co-produced the album with Carolyn Routh, adds his fiddle to the mix. The band really needs to consider adding a fiddle player for the future.

The Rouths co-wrote two songs — “In and Out of Love,” and “How Do I Move On.”

Daniel Routh co-wrote “My Sweet Carolyn” with Austin and sings lead on it. 

But Carolyn Routh, who has a voice you’ll want to hear more of, is the band’s lead singer.

One of the best songs on the album is “Old Black Suit,” a song about an old man looking at the suit he’s worn for all special occasions since his wedding at 22 and now he’s planning to wear it one last time.

A cynic might say that’s one heck of suit. But whether anyone could wear the same suit that many years or not, it’s a good song.

The title cut, written by Donna Hughes, is about missing someone who has died.

“I know that heaven’s glad to have you,” Carolyn Routh sings, “but I sure wish you were here.”

It’s a feeling most people have experienced.

A good album by a good new band.

Can’t find it in stores? Try www.nu-blu.com.