Posted tagged ‘mountain home’

DARIN & BROOKE ALDRIDGE, “Snapshots,” Mountain Home. 11 tracks.

February 9, 2015

“Snapshots” is husband-wife duo Darin and Brooke Aldridge‘s sixth album.

It’s also their best.

The North Carolina natives released their first album, an all-gospel collection, in 2008, a few months before they were married.

Darin worked his way up through the bluegrass ranks, including a stint with the Country Gentlemen.

Brooke’s background is primarily in gospel.

But through the years, the couple has carved out a niche as the “singing sweethearts” of bluegrass.

The 11 songs on the album mostly come from bands the couple has liked or been part of in the past.

It’s a pretty even mix of sacred and secular numbers.

Sam Bush joins the Aldridges on “Get Up John,” an uptempo gospel song written by Bill Monroe, Marty Stuart and Jerry Sullivan.

Fiddle great Bobby Hicks sits in on Monroe’s “My Rose of Old Kentucky.”

Doyle Lawson lends his talents to “Let’s,” a hard-driving love song written by Eddie Adcock.

And Ricky Skaggs adds his harmonies to the gospel song, “When He Calls.”

Other songs include the Everly Brothers‘ “Let It Be Me,” Johnny Cash‘s “Tennessee Flat Top Box,” Dave Macon‘s “Wait Til The Clouds Roll By,” Gillian Welch‘s “Annabelle” and “Will You Be Ready,” written by Darin Aldridge and Bobby Jones.

Can’t find it in stores? Try http://www.DarinAndBrookeAldridge.com.

Keith Lawrence, 691-7301, klawrence@messenger-inquirer.com

CROWE, LAWSON & WILLIAMS, “Standing Tall And Tough,” Mountain Home. 12 tracks.

August 11, 2014

There’s something comforting in the title of the new album by bluegrass legends J.D. Crowe, Doyle Lawson and Paul Williams that’s comforting.

Williams is 79, Crowe is about to turn 77 and Lawson is 70.

In most musical genres, they’d have been retired decades ago.

But in bluegrass, they’re, well, still standing tall and tough.

The three graduates of the Jimmy Martin school of music — all were members of his Sunny Mountain Boys at one time or another — released “Old Friends Get Together,” a collection of gospel tunes, in 2010.

And now, they’re back with an album of secular songs — with a couple of gospel numbers thrown in.

The harmonies are still chilling.

In an era when most acoustic albums seem to be bluegrassish, this one is pure no-mistake-about-it bluegrass.

Crowe was with Martin’s band from 1956 to 1960; Williams from 1958 to 1963; and Lawson from 1963 to 1966.

And the Martin influence runs deep in this album with three songs co-written by Martin and Williams — “My Walking Shoes,” “Little Angel in Heaven” and “Pretending I Don’t Care.”

Williams also wrote or co-wrote “Blue Memories” and the title track.

He also performs his classic version of “Hills of Roane County,” an 1884 murder ballad.

There are a couple of Louvin Brothers gospel songs — “Do You Live What You Preach” and “Insured Beyond The Grave.”

And a couple of old country songs — “Once A Day,” a No. 1 hit for Connie Smith in 1964 and “Fraulein,” a No. 1 song for Bobby Helms in 1957.

Great album by three bluegrass legends.

Can’t find it in stores? Try crossroadsmusic.com.

THE BOXCARS, “It’s Just A Road,” Mountain Home. 12 tracks.

May 6, 2013

The Boxcars, a supergroup that released its first album in 2010, continues to produce great bluegrass.

Adam Steffey and John Bowman once played with Alison Krauss & Union Station.
Ron Stewart, Harold Nixon and Bowman are graduates of J.D. Crowe & The New South.

Keith Garrett and Nixon were members of Blue Moon Rising.

And Steffey and Stewart were in The Dan Tyminski Band.

Their self-titled debut album made several critics’ Ten Best lists that year.

And the latest album, “It’s Just A Road,” will likely make a few lists too.

Band members wrote five of the 12 tracks.

Garrett wrote the title cut, which says that poetry aside, a road is just a road; “Cornelia,” a song about a man with a broken heart who’s determined to make a new start; and “Caryville,” a song about a place where God doesn’t live anymore.

Stewart wrote “Skillet Head Derailed,” a hard-driving instrumental, and “The Devil Held The Gun,” a murder ballad that sounds very old.

The song list includes a couple of A.P. Carter songs — “Coal Miner’s Blues” and “I’m Leaving You This Lonesome Song.”

And there’s a bluegrass version of one of Hank Williams’ lesser-known country songs, “Never Again (Will I Knock On Your Door).”

Other songs include “You Took all The Ramblin’ Out Of Me,” a song about a woman who made him want to settle down; “When Sorrows Encompass Me Around,” an uptempo gospel number; “Southern Train,” a ballad about a man in prison wishing he was on a train headed home; and “Trouble In Mind,” a blues standard that dates back to 1924.

Good album by a great band.

Can’t find it in stores? Try http://www.TheBoxcars.com.