Posted tagged ‘joe mullins’

JOE MULLINS & THE RADIO RAMBLERS, “They’re Playing My Song,” Rebel Records. 14 tracks.

October 22, 2012

The traditional sound of bluegrass music is part of Joe Mullins’ heritage.

He grew up in bluegrass. His father, Paul “Moon” Mullins, played fiddle with the Stanley Brothers and was a member  of The Boys From Indiana before fronting the Traditional Grass.

Joe Mullins came of age performing with the Traditional Grass during the 1980s and early 1990s.

But he left the band in 1995 to devote more time to a radio career, buying four stations in Ohio to create a small country music network.

Over the past decade and a half, Mullins performed occasionally with the supergroup Longview.

Then, in 2006, he formed The Radio RamblersAdam McIntosh, guitar; Evan McGregor, fiddle; Tim Kidd, bass; and Mike Terry, mandolin — and returned to the bluegrass circuit.

“They’re Playing My Song” is the band’s fourth album in six years.

This year, the group was named “emerging artist of the year” by the International Bluegrass Music Association.

The new album is a blend of new and old tunes, but you’d be hard pressed to tell which is which — if you didn’t recognize the standards.

The title cut was a Waylon Jennings song from the 1960s; “Bottom of a Mountain,” was a Johnny Cash single in the 1960s; and “Steel Guitar Rag,” dates back to Bob Wills’ Texas Playboys in 1936. Banjo great Earl Scruggs performed the song on banjo starting in the 1950s, but never released it commercially.

Songs like “Cruisin’ Timber,” “When The Snow Falls On My Foggy Mountain Home,” “She Left Me Standing On The Mountain,” “Lily” and “Katy Daley” have been in bluegrass repertoires for years.

There’s also an Osborne Brothers’ medley tribute on the album.

Newer material includes Bill Anderson’s “Some Kind of War,” a great ballad sung by McIntosh; Becky Buller’s a capella “Moses, Set My People Free”;  McIntosh’s “Granddad (The Preacher)”; and “Terry’s “Our Old Kentucky Home.”

Good album by a good band.

Can’t find it in stores? Try http://www.RadioRamblers.com.

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JOE MULLINS & THE RADIO RAMBLERS, “Rambler’s Call,” Rebel. 12 tracks.

June 28, 2010

Joe Mullins grew up in bluegrass. His father, Paul “Moon” Mullins, played fiddle with the Stanley Brothers and was a member of The Boys From Indiana before fronting the Traditional Grass.

Joe Mullins came of age performing with the Traditional Grass during the 1980s and early 1990s. But he left the band in 1995 to devote more time to a radio career, buying three stations in Ohio to create a small country music network.

Over the past decade and a half, Mullins performed occasionally with Longview. But now, he’s back on the bluegrass circuit with a new band — The Radio Ramblers.

“Rambler’s Call,” their debut album, is a strong traditional bluegrass album with solid picking and great harmonies.

There’s a good mix of old and new material. And a lot of country songs get the bluegrass treatment here.

There’s Porter Wagoner’s “Boston Jail” and “Another Day, Another Dollar,” George Jones’ “Old Blue Tomorrow,” Marty Stuart’s “Farmer’s Blues” and Loretta Lynn’s “Smoke Along  The Track.”

Don Reno’s “Charlotte Breakdown” is the only tune from a bluegrass hall of famer.

Newer tunes include Ronnie Bowman and Sammy Shelor’s “Mountain  Girl” and Gerald Evans Jr.’s “The Old Rocking Chair” and “Don’t You Want To Go Home,” which features a capella gospel quartet singing.

The band features three lead singers — Mullins, Adam McIntosh (formerly with The Dry Branch Fire Squad) and Mike Terry.

Other members include Tim Kidd on bass and Evan McGregor (formerly with the Wildwood Valley Boys) on fiddle.

Good debut album by a band that can go as far as Mullin’s schedule will allow.

Can’t find it in stores? Try www.RadioRamblers.com or www.RebelRecords.com.