Posted tagged ‘Flatt Lonesome’

FLATT LONESOME, “Silence In These Walls,” Mountain Home. 12 tracks

September 25, 2017

Flatt Lonesome has only been together as a band for six years and recording for four.

But they’re already a rising force in bluegrass music.

Last year, the band took home honors from the International Bluegrass Music Association for vocal group of the year, song of the year (“You’re The One”) and album of the year (“Runaway Train”).

This week, their fourth album, “Silence In These Walls,” hit stores.

There are two gospel songs, reflecting the Robertson siblings’ gospel roots — “Draw Me Near” and “Happy Til He Comes.”

The Rev. Dolton Robertson and his wife, Lisa, created a family bluegrass gospel band called Sandy Creek Revival with their children Kelsi, Buddy and Charli.

As they got older, the Robertson children decided to make bluegrass a full-time occupation and formed Flatt Lonesome with friends Dominic Illingworth, Michael Stockton and Paul Harrigill.

Harrigill and Kelsi Robertson married in 2012.

And they’re the principal songwriters on the album, writing or co-writing seven of the 12 songs.

“All My Life” finds the singer wishing she’d never met the man she loves, deciding that she’d rather live in a lie than die in the truth.

“It’s Just Sad,” which contains the album’s title, is another missing someone song.

“Build Me A Bridge” is about someone needing a bridge to get over a lost love.

“I’m Not Afraid To Be Alone” finds a woman deciding that she doesn’t really need a man in her life.

“Cry Oh Cry” finds the singer crying all day over the man who went away.

“You’re The Reason,” a Glenn Campbell song from 1970, blames a former love for the singer’s problems.

Good album by a band that continues to improve with each album.

Can’t find it in stores?

Try http://www.FlattLonesome.com

 

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FLATT LONESOME, “Runaway Train,” Mountain Home. 12 tracks.

September 8, 2015

Flatt Lonesome is a band on the move.

It won’t celebrate its fifth anniversary until early 2016.

But the band was named emerging artist of the year for 2014 by the International Bluegrass Music Association.

And on Oct. 2, Flatt Lonesome’s third studio album, “Runaway Train,” hits stores and websites.

The band’s roots go back several years to the day the Rev. Dolton Robertson and his wife, Lisa, created a family bluegrass gospel band called Sandy Creek Revival with their children Kelsi, Buddy and Charli.

As they got older, the Robertson children decided to make bluegrass a full-time occupation and formed Flatt Lonesome with friends Dominic Illingworth, Michael Stockton and Paul Harrigill.

Harrigill and Kelsi Robertson married in 2012.

Today, the Robertson siblings share lead vocal duties and create a strong harmony sound.

“Runaway Train” is a mixture of gospel, traditional and progressive bluegrass.

Songs come from the likes of Gram Parsons (“Still Feeling Blue”), Dwight Yoakam (“You’re The One”), David and Don Parmley (“Don’t Come Running”) and Tommy Collins and Merle Haggard (“Mixed Up Mess of A Heart”).

But there’s a lot of original material on here too.

The Harrigills wrote or co-wrote six of the tracks — “You’ll Pay,” “In The Heat of the Fire,” “In The Morning,” “Road to Nottingham,” “Casting All Your Care on Him” and “Letting Go.”

Dolton Robertson contributed “New Lease On Life.”

Like the title track implies, Flatt Lonesome is on a fast track in bluegrass these days.

Can’t find it in stores? Try FlattLonesome.com.

FLATT LONESOME, “Too,” Mountain Home. 12 tracks.

July 14, 2014

Flatt Lonesome is a young band, both in the age of the musicians and age of the band, which was formed in early 2011.

But it’s roots go back several years earlier.

The Rev. Dolton Robertson and his wife, Lisa, created a family bluegrass gospel band called Sandy Creek Revival with their children Kelsi, Buddy and Charli.

As they got older, the Robertson children decided to make bluegrass a full-time occupation and formed Flatt Lonesome with friends Dominic Illingworth, Michael Stockton and Paul Harrigill.

Harrigill and Kelsi Robertson married in 2012.

The band’s debut self-titled album was released in January 2013.

“Too” is only the second album, but it shows a band on the move with both traditional and progressive bluegrass sounds, some country and some gospel.

The Robertson siblings share lead vocal duties and create a strong harmony sound.

The first track, “So Far,” is one of those songs that bluegrass is known for — sad lyrics about a woman coping with a break-up backed by uptempo happy music.

“Dangerous Dan” tells the story of a one-armed moonshiner who runs from the law and the lord until the lord catches him.

“Never Let Me Go” is a swinggrass tune about a happy relationship.

“He Still Hears” and “I’m Ready Now” harken back to Flatt Lonesome’s gospel roots.

Harrigill wrote “Make It Through The Day” and “I’m Ready Now.” Kelsi Harrigill wrote “Never Let Me Go.” And two wrote “I Thought You Were Someone I Knew” with Jerry Salley.

Good album by a good young band.

Can’t find it in stores? Try FlattLonesome.com.

FLATT LONESOME, “Flatt Lonesome,” Pisgah Ridge. 11 tracks.

February 11, 2013

Flatt Lonesome is a 2-year-old bluegrass band that grew out of Sandy Creek Revival — a band that featured the Rev. Dolton Robertson, his wife, Lisa, and their three children Kelsi, Buddy and Charli.

In January 2011, the three siblings teamed with Dominic Illingworth, Michael Stockton and Paul Harrigill (who married Kelsi Robertson last fall), to form Flatt Lonesome.

The Robertsons share the singing and Kelsi contributed two songs, “Just Any Moment,” an uptempo gospel number, and “One Foot in the Grave,” a song about an unhappy relationship.

The sibling harmony is one of the band’s strongest aspects.

Songs include Hazel Dickens’, “You’ll Get No More of Me,” a song about a woman kicking out the man who broke her heart; “Does My Ring Burn Your Finger,” a song that questions whether he loves her; “Draggin’ My Heart Around,” a song that finds a woman honky-tonking while her man waits at home; and “On The Right Side,” a gospel song.

There are also a couple of strong covers — “Jackson,” the 1965 June Carter-Johnny Cash classic, and “Boondocks,” a country hit for Little Big Town in 2005.

Good debut album by a good new band.

Can’t find it in stores? Try FlattLonesome.com