Posted tagged ‘dobro’

PHIL LEADBETTER, “The Next Move,” Pinecastle. 12 tracks.

October 13, 2014

Earlier this month, the International Bluegrass Music Association named Phil Leadbetter its 2014 Dobro player of the year — an award he also won in 2005.

Only two other people — Jerry Douglas and Rob Ickes — have won the award in its 25-year history. They join Leadbetter as backing musicians on his new album.

The award caps a remarkable comeback for a man who was diagnosed with Stage III Hodgkin’s lymphoma three years ago.

Doctors warned that even if he survived the cancer, Leadbetter’s motor skills might be damaged by the medication he was taking to fight the cancer.

He never expected to play again.

But Leadbetter — and his skills — survived.

And he’s back with a new album — “The Next Move.”

The title comes from Leadbetter’s wondering what God had in store for him as he made the next move in his life.

The bad news is the cancer has returned and he’s back in a second fight for his life.

Leadbetter isn’t a vocalist, but he’s joined by a variety of friends who are on this album.

Shawn Camp sings a song he co-wrote, “Jesus, My Old Dog and Me,” one of the best songs on the album. He also vocalizes on “Pull The Trigger.”

Ken Mellons‘ version of “I’m A Modern Day Interstate Gypsy” is another great song .

John Cowan sings lead on “I’m A Ramblin’ Rolling Stone.” Marty Raybon and Joe Diffie share the vocal work on “Baptism.”

Steve Gulley and Dale Ann Bradley do “I’ve Never Seen A Love That Wasn’t Blind.” Steve Wariner does “Hole In The Earth.” Con Hunley sings “Georgia On My Mind.”

Matt Leadbetter adds his Dobro to his father’s for “Leadbelly,” a tune Phil Leadbetter wrote. “When The Roll Is Called Up Yonder” is done as a solo instrumental — just Phil Leadbetter and his Dobro.

Instrumental guests include Bela Fleck, Buck White, Sam Bush, Steve Thomas, Cory Walker, Mike Bub, Sierra Hull, Kenny Smith, Tim Crouch, Charlie Cushman, Carl Jackson and Alan Bibey among others.

It would be a great album if Leadbetter weren’t fighting for his life. But his battle against cancer makes it even more moving.

Can’t find it in stores? Try http://www.PinecastleMusic.com.

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MIKE AULDRIDGE, JERRY DOUGLAS & ROB ICKES, “Three Bells,” Rounder. 11 tracks.

July 28, 2014

It’s unusual to have an album of music featuring only one instrument — especially if the instrument is a resophonic guitar.

But when the instrument is played by three masters like Mike Audridge, Jerry Douglas and Rob Ickes, it’s a little less strange.

“Mike and I originally thought Jerry was a little off his rocker to not use a backing band,” Ickes said in a news release about “Three Bells.” “But there was something special in how the three of us were interacting musically.”

Resophonic guitars, often referred to as Dobros, grew out of the Hawaiian music craze of the 1920s. Josh Graves introduced the instrument to bluegrass in the 1950s as a member of Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs’ Foggy Mountain Boys.

Auldridge, a founding member of the Seldom Scene, was a legendary resophonic guitar player, who had toured with people like Lyle Lovett and Emmylou Harris.

But he was dying from a long battle with prostate cancer when Douglas and Ickes suggested they record some music together — a follow up to their 1994 Grammy-winning, “The Great Dobro Sessions.”

It wasn’t necessarily going to be an album, they said. They just wanted to record memories while Auldridge was still able.

The sesions were recorded in May and September of 2012.

And Auldridge died on Dec. 28.

Luckily for bluegrass fans, those final recordings with Auldridge did become an album.

Rounder is scheduled to release it on Sept. 16.

Each of the men performs a solo.

Auldridge does a medley of “Till There Was You/Moon River.” Douglas performs his own, “The Perils of Private Mulvaney.” And Ickes plays his own, “The Message.”

Other songs include “Silver Threads Among The Gold,” Don Reno‘s “I’m Using My Bible For A Roadmap,” Douglas and Stuart Duncan‘s “North,” Auldridge’s “For Buddy,” Ickes’ “Dobro Heaven” and the title cut, a 1959 country hit for The Browns, but originally a French pop song called “Les Trois Cloches.”

A fine album by some of the best resphonic guitar players ever on the planet.

Available at Rounder.com on Sept. 16.