Archive for October 2017

DANIEL CRABTREE, “In The Shadow of His Wings,” no label. 13 tracks

October 23, 2017

 

“In The Shadow of His Wings,” Daniel Crabtree‘s second bluegrass gospel album, is a singer-songwriter showcase.

Crabtree wrote all 13 songs on the album.

He says on his website that he’s had a passion for bluegrass gospel since he was a kid.

And he’s performed it in recent years with The Lights Chapel Boys.

A few years ago, Crabtree says he discovered that he could write songs and he’s been doing it daily ever since.

The title track is about Biblical heroes who God sheltered from harm. And now, the singer is asking for the same shelter.

“Land of Milk and Honey” says we’ve been taught to love each other and we need to do it.

“Lord, I’m Gonna Need Your Strength Today” finds a man on his way to a friend’s funeral, asking God for the strength to get through the day.

“I’m On My Way To Gloryland” and “The Gospel Train” are uptempo songs about getting ready for heaven.

“Where Jesus Is” finds the singer realizing that he’s lost his way and deciding that he wants to get to heaven.

An all-star lineup of musicians backs Crabtree on the album — including Scott Vestal, Mike Bub, Rob Ickes, Cody Kilby and Patrick McAvinue

Can’t find it in stores? Try http://www.DanielCrabtreeMusic.com

 

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GINA CLOWES, “True Colors,” Mountain Home. 12 tracks

October 16, 2017

Gina Clowes picked up a banjo for the first time when she was 11.

A year later, she was taking lessons from acclaimed bluegrass banjo player Murphy Henry.

By her late teens, Clowes was playing professionally with such bands as Blue Light Special, New Girls Night Out, Nash Street and On The Run.

After time out to start a family, she’s been playing banjo with Chris Jones and the Night Drivers for almost two years.

“True Colors” is a collection of 11 songs she wrote plus Nina Simone‘s “Beautiful Land.”

The title track is a bouncy love song, a tribute to her husband.

“Puppet Show” is about a woman in a controlling relationship who cuts her strings and leaves.

“Saylor’s Creek” is an instrumental that was inspired by a Civil War battle.

“Looking For Sunshine,” with vocals by her sister, Malia Furtado, finds a woman looking for a friend to help her heart mend.

“For Better or Worse,” with vocals by Heather Berry Mabe, is about a woman who sticks by her abusive husband because she promised to stay with him for better or worse. Then, he dies and she finds happiness.

Scott Bannon sings lead on “Good Old Fashioned Heartbreak,” a song about, well, heartbreak.

“I’ll Stay Home” finds a woman telling her musician lover to go back on the road and she’ll wait for him at home.

“Goodbye, Lianne” is a fiddle tune; “Wayward Kite” is classical; and “La Puerta del Diablo” — “The Devil’s Door” — is a gypsy jazz style.

Good album.

Can’t find it in stores? Try http://mountainhomemusiccompany.com/project/gina-clowes-releases/

 

STEVE GULLEY & NEW PINNACLE, “Time Won’t Wait,” Rural Rhythm. 12 tracks

October 9, 2017

Steve Gulley, a second-generation bluegrass musician, has been around the block a time or two.

He spent two years with Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver, moved on to Mountain Heart, then Grasstowne and finally worked with Dale Ann Bradley before launching New Pinnacle in 2015.

“Time Won’t Wait” is the group’s third album.

“Drowned in Sorrow,” the first single off the album, is a hard-driving song about lost love.

The title track says, “Time is not your friend.”

Gulley wrote or co-wrote five of the songs, including those two, and “You’ll Cry For Me,” a song that says she doesn’t want him now but she will when he’s gone; “You Can’t Help Who You Love,” a song about life’s choices; and “Leaving Sounds Pretty Good To Me,” a song that finds her begging him to stay, but him thinking that leaving sounds better every day.

Like most bluegrass albums these days, “Time Won’t Wait” features a traditional country song — Ronnie Milsap‘s 1976 country classic, “I Can Almost See Houston From Here.”

“The Road Back To You” finds a man at life’s crossroads, deciding to turn around and go home.

“I’m All Right” is about a trucker hitting the road and missing his family and home.

Jim & Jesse McReynolds’ “Congratulations Anyway” is about a man meeting his ex’s new love.

“G-Force,” written by Gary Robinson Jr., the band’s mandolin player, is an uptempo instrumental.

“Safe In His Arms” is bluegrass gospel.

And “Hold Your Horses” is an uptempo song about a man who’s not ready for marriage.

Another good album by Gulley and the band.

Look for it in stores on Oct. 20 or order it now at www.stevegulley.com.

FELLER & HILL, “Brothers And Heros,” Rural Rhythm. 13 tracks

October 2, 2017

If you like classic country music and bluegrass, you need to discover Tom Feller and Chris Hill.

Their sound is blend of both.

Tom Feller is a nephew of Aubrey, Jerry, and Tom Holt, the backbone of the legendary Boys From Indiana.

He’s worked with Redwing, the Larry Stephenson Band, Rhonda Vincent & the Rage, 3 Fox Drive and the Wildwood Valley Boys.

Chris Hill, a competitive clogger as well as a banjo player, has worked with the Wildwood Valley Boys, Gerald Evans & Paradise, the James King Band and Karl Shiflett & Big Country Show.

The two began exploring the possibilities of creating a band in 2010 and went on the road full time with their band, the Bluegrass Buckaroos, in 2013.

“Brothers and Heroes,” their latest album, is a blend of classics and new songs.

The first single, “The Bugler,” is one of three Civil War songs on the album.

It tells the tale of a boy who becomes a bugler for the Army in an effort to find his missing father — and the mother who goes looking for both.

“Atlanta Is Burning” is the story of a dying soldier who misses his family.

And “Rebecca of New Orleans” tells the story of a Southern woman who falls in love with a wounded Union soldier.

“Hammer Down” is a hard-driving song about a band flying down the interstate on its way to a bluegrass festival.

Covers of country songs include the Louvin Brothers’ “Childish Love,” Patsy Cline‘s “Back in Baby’s Arms”  and Jerry Reed‘s instrumental, “Jerry’s Breakdown.”

There’s also a cover of the Everly Brothers‘ “Wake Up Little Susie,” which always sounds funny when grown men are singing it.

Bobby Osborne joins the guys for a cover of the Osborne Brothers‘ “Tennessee Hound Dog.”

There’s a good cheatin’ song — “Lord, Help Me Decide” — which asks help to decide which woman to keep and which to dump.

And there’s a traditional murder ballad — “Duncan and Brady,” based on the shooting of policeman James Brady in the Charles Starkes Saloon in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1890. Bartender Harry Duncan was convicted of the murder and later executed.

Guests on the album include Tony Holt, Aubrey Holt, Jerry Holt, Bobby Osborne, Larry Stephenson, Junior Sisk, Lizzy Long, Heather Berry-Mabe, Michael Cleveland, Glen Duncan and Steve Thomas.

Can’t find it in stores? Try http://www.fellerandhill.com

Keith Lawrence, 270-691-7301, klawrence@messenger-inquirer.com