Archive for July 2017

BILLY DROZE, “To Whom It May Concern,” Rural Rhythm. 12 tracks

July 31, 2017

 

In 1962, Bob Droze, a country, gospel and bluegrass artist, released an album on the Rural Rhythm label.

Now, 55 years later, his son Billy has done the same.

Billy Droze, a songwriter who has written hits for The Grascals, Flatt Lonesome, Junior Sisk and others, co-wrote all 12 songs on “To Whom It May Concern.”

But the former lead singer for Shenandoah, who used the name Billy Ryan at the time, is trying to make his mark as a singer these days.

The first single off the album, “Kentucky Blue,” went to No. 1 on the Bluegrass Today charts.

And “Better With Time,” the second single, is at No. 10 this week.

Marty Raybon, another former Shenandoah lead singer, joins Droze on “Chill in the Room,” a song about a love affair that’s about to end.

“Go Back There Again” is a song about longing to visit places of the past that no longer exist.

“Home in Hell” says that the devil is the only one who belongs in hell and don’t let him drag you down.

“Haunted By The Wind” tells of an old man buried in a shallow grave and how his spirit is leading the singer somewhere.

“My Father’s Son” is a gospel song.

“Rain Won’t Quit” is about hard times.

The title track is a string of platitudes that the singer has learned are true.

And “Sounds Like Pretty Music” is about the sounds that are music to him — a baby’s cry, a farmer praying for rain and hearing the thunder roll and a preacher in a country church.

Can’t find it in stores?

Try Amazon or other popular music sites.

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KIM ROBINS, “Raining in Baltimore,” Pinecastle. 12 tracks

July 10, 2017

If you haven’t discovered Kim Robins yet, this is your chance.

“Raining in Baltimore” is the follow-up to her recent “40 Years Late” album

That title refers to the musical career she put on hold when she became a mother at 19.

Before that, the Bloomington, Indiana, native was an opening act for Loretta Lynn, Conway Twitty, Barbara Mandrell and The Oak Ridge Boys as a teenager.

But that was then and this is now.

And Robins, now a grandmother of two, is back with an all-star studio band — Ron Stewart, Rickey Wasson, Adam Steffey and Harold Nixon.

“Raining in Baltimore” is her first major label release.

And, boy, does she sound good.

“Eye For An Eye,” the opening track, is an uptempo tale of vengeance with a man out to kill the man who killed his son.

Robins wrote three tracks — the title cut about a country girl in a big city hoping to get a call from the one she loves; “She’s Just Like You,” which warns her ex that his new love is just like him and she’ll be as unfaithful as he was; and “Bitter Game,” about a woman who keeps lying to herself when she says she’s over him.

There’s a good bluegrass cover of “My Baby Thinks He’s A Train,” the 1981 Rosanne Cash country hit.

And Robins shines on Dolly Parton‘s “Sacred Memories.”

There’s not a bad track on the album.

Can’t find it in stores?

Try KimRobins.com, starting July 21.

 

THE FARM HANDS, “Colors,” Pinecastle. 12 tracks

July 3, 2017

The Farm Hands have been traveling the bluegrass circuit for seven years now.

And they’re starting to get the kind of attention they deserve.

Tim Graves, Daryl Mosley, Keith Tew and Don Hill have all had success on their own and it’s translating into success for the group.

“Colors,” the new album on the Pinecastle label, features a good collection of traditional bluegrass and bluegrass gospel songs from a band with three lead singers.

The title track is a patriotic song about the colors of the military as well as the red, white and blue of the flag.

“Rural Route” and “His Old Fiddle” are both filled with nostalgia for the country life.

There’s a good bluegrass version of Chris Hillman and Gram Parsons‘ “Sin City,” originally recorded 41 years ago by the Flying Burrito Brothers.

And they turn “They Don’t Make ‘Em Like My Daddy Anymore,” the old Loretta Lynn country classic, into a good bluegrass song.

Tew’s “The Old 109” is a ballad about a train wreck on a cold winter night.

There’s a bluegrass version of Bob Dylan‘s “Nashville Skyline Rag.”

The album also features a collection of good bluegrass gospel — “The Four of Us,” “The Bible In The Drawer,” “Crying for Crumbs,” “I’m Going Home” and “Anywhere Is Home.”

Can’t find it in stores?

Look for it at http://www.farmhandsquartet.com/store.html