Archive for July 2016

JIM AND LYNNA WOOLSEY, “Heart and Soul, Blood and Bone,” Broken Record Records, 11 tracks.

July 25, 2016

Jim and Lynna Woolsey have been making music together for nearly four decades, dating back to their time in the 1970s with the Indiana-based Patoka Valley Boys.

But they’re really singer-songwriters, who just happen to work in bluegrass.

In the summer of 2014, they released their first album of original songs, “The Road That Brings You Home.”

Now, they’re back with “Heart and Soul, Blood and Bone,” which features 11 self-penned songs.

The title track is about the Great Depression, the Dust Bowl and those who waited 10 long years for life to get better.

“Faith could move mountains,” it says, “but couldn’t make it rain.”

“Time,” the first single, which features Jim Lauderdale‘s vocals, is about people chasing fame, racing the clock to try to achieve it.

“Just Like Me” is about people filled with rage because of things that are wrong in their lives.

“Notes From Home” tells the story of an old man who  left home years ago and comes home to find a suitcase full of letters his family wrote him years ago, but didn’t how where to send them.

“Pike County Blues” is a humorous look at rural America though the eyes of a man who gave his heart of Jesus but sleeps with a gun.

“Freedom is a tribute to veterans.

And “Lights of Home” is for the people who have to travel to make a living.

Look for it in record stores Aug. 4 or check Amazon or similar websites.

Keith Lawrence (270) 691-7301

klawrence@messenger-inquirer.com

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STEVE GULLEY & NEW PINNACLE, “Aim High,” Rural Rhythm. 12 tracks.

July 18, 2016

 

Steve Gulley has been around the bluegrass block a few times.

He spent 16 years at historic Renfro Valley as a performer, music director, studio manager and producer.

From there, Gulley spent a couple of years with Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver.

Then, he became a founding member of Mountain Heart, went on to Grasstowne and spent a couple of years working with Dale Ann Bradley.

Last year, he formed New Pinnacle and went on his own.

The band’s first album, which was self-titled, was well received.

And the new album, “Aim High,” should be as well.

Some bluegrass albums these days are more country or Americana than bluegrass.

But “Aim High” is unmistakenly — and unapologetically — bluegrass.

The title track, a hard-charging song about not being afraid to break the mold and take chances, has already topped the Bluegrass Today charts.

Gulley co-wrote three songs — “Deceitful Kind,” “Love Brings You Home” and “Short Life Full of Trouble.”

The first is an untempo murder ballad.

The second is a ballad about a man who’s been everywhere, but now love is calling him home.

The third is a ballad about a man who’s going in style — until he’s murdered.

“Not Now” is the story of a man who doesn’t have time for his wife and son — and then he’s shot and pleads for more time.

“Closer to the Shore” is pure mountain gospel.

“Common Man’s Train of Thought” is a song about politics and who’s going to represent the common people.

Another good album by a man who’s known for good albums.

Can’t find it in stores? Try SteveGulley.com

Keith Lawrence (270) 691-7301

klawrence@messenger-inquirer.com

DOYLE LAWSON & QUICKSILVER, “Burden Bearer,” Mountain Home. 20 tracks.

July 11, 2016

 

Doyle Lawson has been playing bluegrass professionally for 53 years, since he joined Jimmy Martin’s Sunny Mountain Boys as the banjo player in February 1963.

In 1966, he joined J.D. Crowe’s Kentucky Mountain Boys, playing guitar and mandolin.

Lawson was with the Country Gentlemen through most of the 1970s and then created his own band — now called Quicksilver — in 1979.

Today with upwards of 40 albums to their credit, Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver have been named the International Bluegrass Music Association’s vocal group of the year seven times and were inducted into the IBMA Hall of Fame in 2012.

They’ve also won numerous awards as gospel artists.

The new album, “Burden Bearer,” highlights the band’s gospel roots.

It’s a mixture of bluegrass and a capella gospel, evenly divided with 10 songs in each style.

There’s old material — “How Great Thou Art,” “God Gave Noah The Rainbow Sign,” “The Touch of His Gentle Hand.”

And new stuff — the title track and “Best Friends” among them.

But what it mostly is is good bluegrass gospel.

Can’t find it in stores? Try DoyleLawson.com.

 NEWTOWN, “Harlan Road,” Mountain Home. 11 tracks

July 5, 2016

Kati Penn-Williams started playing the fiddle when she was 10.

By the time she was 12, she was playing and singing with the Young Acoustic All-Stars, a band of teen-aged musicians.

Later, she became a member of the New Coon Creek Girls and continued through its transformation into the Dale Ann Bradley Band.

Since 2009, she’s headed NewTown, a Lexington, Ky.-based band, with her husband, Junior Williams, who honed his skills with NewFound Road.

They’re both good singers, giving the band more strength.

“Harlan Road,” the new album, is bluegrass infused with Americana, jazz, funk and a bit of rock.,

The title track, sung by Junior Williams, finds a lonely man waiting for his woman to come to him on a coal train.

His “Drifter Blues” tells the tale of a man who’s down on his luck and sinking lower every day.

And Williams’ “Hard Times” finds a man who’s desperate for a job turning to crime because “hell’s probably better than trying to get by.”

Kati Penn-Williams’ “All That I Can Take” finds a woman who’s given all she can and is hitting the road for a Mexican beach.

Her version of Lucinda Williams‘ “Can’t Let Go” rocks with as much country as bluegrass.

And “The Crows and the Jakes” finds her about to meet the hangman.

“Come Back To Me” is a duet that finds both singers wanting to reunite.

“Feast of the Gryphon,” written by Hayes Griffin, the band’s guitar player, is the album’s only instrumental.

Can’t find it in stores? Try TheNewtownBand.com.

Keith Lawrence (270) 691-7301

klawrence@messenger-inquirer.com